European Ash Seed Extract (FraxiPure™) Decreases Obesity and Blood Glucose

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”



EUROPEAN ASH SEED EXTRACT (FRAXIPURE) DECREASES OBESITY AND BLOOD GLUCOSE

 

Previous studies have suggested that an extract of seeds from the European Ash tree (Fraxinus excelsior) may reduce weight gain, and may decrease the rise in blood sugar levels that accompanies meals. A newly published laboratory study, which appears in the current issue of the journal Phytomedicine, appears to add further weight to these hypotheses.

In this laboratory study, a commercially available extract of European Ash tree seeds, FraxiPure™, was included in the diet of mice that were intentionally fed a high-fat diet over a period of 16 weeks. Two additional groups of mice were used as “controls,” including mice fed either a low-fat diet or a high-fat diet (but without the addition of FraxiPure™).

Among the mice receiving both a high-fat diet and FraxiPure™, the weight gain associated with a high-fat diet was 32 percent lower than the weight gain that was observed in the mice that received a high-fat diet without FraxiPure™. Fasting blood sugar (glucose) levels were also reduced by a highly significant 77 percent among the mice that received the FraxiPure™ supplement. Insulin levels in the blood were also decreased by 53 percent among the mice that received the FraxiPure™ dietary supplement. Another interesting apparent benefit of FraxiPure™ was a 67 percent decrease in the incidence of fatty liver changes, which often accompanies high-fat diets, obesity, and diabetes in humans, and which has been linked with potentially severe liver disease in humans.

It is too soon to tell if the many apparent health benefits of FraxiPure™ that were observed in these laboratory mice will also apply equally to humans. (Unfortunately, what works in laboratory mice and rats often does not work in humans.) However, in view of the worldwide epidemic of obesity, and the many serious ailments that are linked to obesity (including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, lung disease, cancer, chronic liver disease, arthritis, and gallstones, to name a few), a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical research trial should now be considered, to assess both the effectiveness and the safety of FraxiPure™ (or other European Ash seed extracts) in humans.

For a complete discussion of evidence-based approaches to cancer risk and cancer prevention, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race For the price of a cheeseburger, fries, and a shake, you can purchase this landmark new book, in both paperback and e-book formats, and begin living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle today!


On Thanksgiving Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books! On Christmas Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list!



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity



Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author




For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: Texas Blues Jam



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month. (More than 1.2 million health-conscious people visited Weekly Health Update in 2010!) As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.





Bookmark and Share



 

 

Post to Twitter

Vitamin D and Death Due to Colorectal Cancer

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”


VITAMIN D AND DEATH DUE TO COLORECTAL CANCER

Based upon recent high quality clinical research, only Vitamin D, among all vitamins, appears to have potentially significant cancer prevention effects.  However, as with all areas of clinical and laboratory research, one can find contradictory research results for Vitamin D, as well.

An innovative prospective clinical research study is now reporting its results, which appear to link Vitamin D deficiency to colorectal cancer death rates.  As with previous research studies, the findings of this study strongly suggest that Vitamin D deficiency may be linked with a higher risk of death due to colorectal cancer.  The findings of this clinical research study appear in the current issue of the journal Cancer.

An interesting and unique aspect of this particular clinical research study was its evaluation of the potential impact of Vitamin D deficiency on the well-known increased risk of death due to colorectal cancer that has been observed in African-Americans when compared to Caucasian patients.  As our bodies create active Vitamin D from exposure of our skin to sunlight, and as people with darkly pigmented skin are more prone to developing Vitamin D deficiency, when compared to lightly-pigmented people, the authors of this study sought to assess the potential colorectal cancer risk impact of Vitamin D deficiency on patient volunteers with darkly pigmented skin.

In this large public health study, the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III), which was conducted between 1988 and 1994, blood levels of Vitamin D were measured in study volunteers.  Patients with a Vitamin D level of less than 20 ng/dL were considered to be deficient in Vitamin D.

As previous public health studies have also shown, the results of this study indicated that African-Americans are twice as likely to die of colorectal cancer when compared to Caucasians.  When blood levels of Vitamin D were considered, specifically, the increased risk of dying from colorectal cancer observed in African-American patients decreased by 40 percent among those African-Americans who had normal levels of Vitamin D in their blood.  (These results, therefore, suggest that at least 40 percent of the increased risk of dying from colorectal cancer in African-American persons is likely to be caused by Vitamin D deficiency.)  When patients of all races were considered in terms of Vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for death due to colorectal cancer,patient volunteers with a blood level of Vitamin D less than 20 ng/dL were more than twice as likely (i.e., a 211 percent increase in risk)to die of colorectal cancer during the course of this prospective research study, when compared with patients who had normal Vitamin D levels.

In summary, this large prospectively conducted public health study found, as have previous studies, a significant association between Vitamin D deficiency and the risk of dying from colorectal cancer.  (Previous Vitamin D studies have also identified a 25 to 40 percent reduction in the incidence of colorectal cancer, and death due to colorectal cancer, in study volunteers with blood Vitamin D levels in the 30 to 40 ng/dL range.)  While not all clinical research studies have shown this level of colorectal cancer risk reduction associated with normal blood levels of Vitamin D, this particular study joins a growing list of clinical studies that appear to show a significant reduction in colorectal cancer risk associated with adequate levels of Vitamin D in the blood.

As excessive Vitamin D intake can cause significant health problems (especially in patients with kidney disease and parathyroid gland disease), you should check with your doctor prior to considering the use of Vitamin D supplements.

 

For a complete discussion of Vitamin D as a cancer prevention agent, and other evidence-based approaches to cancer risk and cancer prevention, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race.  For the price of a cheeseburger, fries, and a shake, you can purchase this landmark new book, in both paperback and e-book formats, and begin living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle today!


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my new book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-Million,Vroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

On Thanksgiving Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books! On Christmas Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list!


Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link:

Texas Blues Jam



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month. (More than 1.2 million health-conscious people visited Weekly Health Update in 2010!) As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.





Bookmark and Share



 

 

Post to Twitter

Axillary Lymph Node Dissection for Breast Cancer May Not Be Necessary

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”



AXILLARY LYMPH NODE DISSECTION FOR BREAST CANCER MAY NOT BE NECESSARY

The management of breast cancer has undergone many advances since the radical mastectomy that first came into popularity in the United States in the late 19th century.  At that time, even early cancers of the breast were managed by surgically removing the entire breast, the underlying chest wall muscles, and all of the lymph nodes under the armpit (axilla).  It wasn’t until the 1970s that surgeons began to abandon radical mastectomy, in favor of the less disfiguring modified radical mastectomy, based upon emerging research data at the time.  By the 1980s, additional research data had confirmed that women who underwent lumpectomy plus radiation therapy experienced equivalent survival when compared to women who underwent mastectomy.  In the late 1990s, another major paradigm shift in the surgical management of breast cancer occurred with the rapid adoption of sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy, which had previously also revolutionized the surgical management of melanoma.  Following the successful application of SLN biopsy to breast cancer, the 60 to 70 percent of women with breast cancer who have normal axillary SLNs (i.e., no evidence of spread of breast cancer cells to the lymph nodes in the axilla) could now avoid undergoing complete axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), wherein about two-thirds of the armpit lymph nodes are surgically removed.  As the risk of arm swelling (lymphedema), numbness, and other long-term side effects associated with ALND are only one-tenth as common following SLN biopsy, the majority of women undergoing breast cancer surgery over the past decade have been able to avoid many of the chronic complications and side effects associated with the more radical surgical approaches used in the past.  However, between one-fourth and one-third of women diagnosed with breast cancer will still be found to have tumor cell in their SLNs, and most of these women have routinely been advised to undergo ALND to remove additional armpit lymph nodes.

Now, a newly published clinical research study from the American College of Surgeons Oncology Group has, once again, dramatically shifted the paradigm of breast cancer management.  This clinical research study, which I was privileged to participate in when I was a Surgical Oncology Fellow at the John Wayne Cancer Institute, enrolled 891 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, and with early metastatic cancer involving one or more of their axillary SLNs.  These women were evenly randomized into two groups.  One group underwent the standard therapy of ALND, while the other half of these patient volunteers were observed, without further surgery, following SLN biopsy.  The results of this pioneering breast cancer research study appear in the current issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

After an average duration of patient follow-up of more than 6 years, this pivotal clinical study has confirmed what many of us oncologists have long suspected.  In women with evidence of microscopic spread of breast cancer to one or more axillary SLNs, there was no difference in overall survival whether or not they went on to undergo ALND, as long as they underwent otherwise standard therapy for lymph-node-positive breast cancer (including lumpectomy, radiation therapy to the breast, and chemotherapy).

I cannot overstate the potential impact of the findings of this important clinical study.  However, while some have heralded the findings of this study as breaking important new ground, in fact that ground was broken by the very same pioneering prospective clinical research study (the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project’s NSABP B-04 study, which began in 1971) that originally led surgeons to abandon radical mastectomy.  Within this older large prospective clinical study was an important subgroup of 586 women with palpably enlarged axillary lymph nodes (and which actually indicated a more advanced stage of lymph node involvement than the women who participated in the more modern American College of Surgeons Oncology Group study).  Like all of the women who participated in the NSABP B-04 study, these 586 breast cancer patients with enlarged armpit lymph nodes were randomized to undergo radical mastectomy with radical ALND versus mastectomy alone (and no lymph node surgery at all ) combined with radiation therapy.  After an average follow-up of 25 years, there wasabsolutely no difference in survival between the women who underwent radical lymph node surgery combined with radical mastectomy versus those women who underwent simple mastectomy alone (and no lymph node surgery) followed by radiation therapy.

Thus, the newly reported findings of this pivotal American College of Surgeons Oncology Group clinical study only further validates the findings of the nearly 40 year-old NSABP B-04 study, and should put to rest, once and for all, the decades-old debate about the role of surgery in the management of the axillary lymph nodes in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer.  At a minimum, surgeons should now advise their breast cancer patients that there is now 40 years worth of high-level clinical research data showing that the surgical removal of most or all of the armpit lymph nodes (ALND) does not improve survival in women who otherwise undergo standard breast cancer treatment that includes lumpectomy (or mastectomy), chemotherapy, and radiation therapy.

I predict that the findings of these two landmark breast cancer surgical studies will, together, once again revolutionize the surgical management of breast cancer, and will further reduce the adverse impact of surgery on hundreds of thousands of women around the world each year.  Indeed, this latest revolution in the management of breast cancer has already started at major cancer centers in the United States, where women are already being advised that the finding of early spread of breast cancer cells to their axillary SLNs no longer mandates “completion ALND,” as long as these patients undergo standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy following lumpectomy and SLN biopsy.


For a complete discussion of evidence-based approaches to cancer risk and cancer prevention, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race.  For the price of a cheeseburger, fries, and a shake, you can purchase this landmark new book, in both paperback and e-book formats, and begin living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle today!


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my new book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!


On Thanksgiving Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books! On Christmas Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list!



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity




Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author




For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: Texas Blues Jam



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month. (More than 1.2 million health-conscious people visited Weekly Health Update in 2010!) As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.







Bookmark and Share




Post to Twitter

Mammograms Predict Risk of Heart Disease and Stroke

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”




MAMMOGRAMS PREDICT RISK OF

HEART DISEASE AND STROKE

In view of the growing concern about the potential adverse health effects of CT scans (including increased cancer risk), the enthusiasm for performing CT scans of the heart and coronary arteries, as a noninvasive method of diagnosing asymptomatic heart disease, has been decreasing. Now, an innovative clinical research study, which has just been published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, has evaluated the potential value of mammograms (which use low-dose x-rays to screen for breast cancer) to predict the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Calcification of the arteries within the breast are detected in approximately 10 to 20 percent of mammograms, and the incidence of these vascular calcifications rise in proportion to a woman’s age. Previous clinical research studies have suggested that the presence of vascular calcifications on mammograms may be an important early indicator of cardiovascular disease risk. However, the clinical research data in this area has been somewhat inconsistent, to date.

In this prospective clinical research study, 1,919 women, with an average age of 56 years, who presented for routine annual screening mammograms were subsequently followed for 5 years.Data was collected regarding their cardiovascular disease risk factors, and their own personal history (if any) of cardiovascular disease, as well as the presence or absence of cardiovascular disease in family members. This data was collected at the beginning of the study, and was updated throughout the course of the study.

The findings of this study were quite dramatic. During the 5-year course of this study, 21 percent of the women who were noted to have vascular calcifications within the breast, on routine mammography, were found to have coronary artery disease, while only 5 percent of the women without vascular calcifications on mammography had clinical evidence of coronary artery disease. Among those women with no clinical evidence of coronary heart disease at the beginning of this clinical study, 6 percent of those with vascular calcifications eventually developed coronary artery disease during the brief 5-year course of this study (compared to 2 percent of the women without vascular calcifications of the breast). Moreover, among healthy women with no history of coronary artery disease at the beginning of this study, 58 percent went on to experience a stroke if they had vascular calcifications in the breast, while 13 percent of the women without vascular calcifications of the breast experienced a stroke during this 5-year study.

The findings of this clinical research study strongly suggest that vascular calcifications of the breast, in women who are undergoing routine annual screening mammograms, may be a powerful indicator of increased risk for both coronary artery disease and stroke. While larger and longer-term prospective clinical research studies should be performed to validate the findings of this relatively small clinical research study, the findings of this study are consistent with earlier studies that have also linked vascular calcifications of the breast with a significant increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that there may be an important secondary role for screening mammograms, beyond early detection of breast cancer. As women who have evidence of arterial calcifications of the breast by mammography (when compared to women without vascular calcifications) appear to be nearly 4 times more likely to have coronary artery disease, and have more than 4 times the risk of stroke, the presence of vascular calcifications on screening mammograms should prompt patients and their physicians to look for risk factors that can be modified to reduce the risk of premature illness and death related to cardiovascular disease.

For a complete discussion of the potential impact of medical x-rays (including CT scans) on cancer risk, as well as important evidence-based approaches to cancer prevention, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race. For the price of a cheeseburger, fries, and a shake, you can purchase this landmark new book, in both paperback and e-book formats, and begin living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle today!


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my new book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!


On Thanksgiving Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books! On Christmas Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.com Top 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list!



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity




Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author




For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: Texas Blues Jam



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month. (More than 1.2 million health-conscious people visited Weekly Health Update in 2010!) As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.






Bookmark and Share




Post to Twitter

Enter Google AdSense Code Here

Comments

Better Tag Cloud