Soy Foods, Pumpkin Seeds and Sunflower Seeds Reduce Breast Cancer Risk






 

A new study links the consumption of soy foods, pumpkins seeds, and sunflower seeds with a decreased risk of breast cancer.


 

 

SOY FOODS, PUMPKIN SEEDS AND SUNFLOWER SEEDS REDUCE BREAST CANCER RISK

As I discuss in my bestselling book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, phytoestrogens are substances found in plant-based foods that have weak estrogen-like effects in the body.  As estrogen is a known risk factor for breast cancer, there has been understandable concern that phytoestrogens, if consumed regularly, may lead to an increased risk of breast cancer over time.  While the data supporting this hypothesis has been both weak and contradictory thus far, some of the strongest available data regarding phytoestrogen intake and breast cancer risk has, counterintuitively, linked certain phytoestrogen-rich foods, and especially soy foods like tofu, with a decreased lifetime risk of breast cancer, particularly when consumed before and during the onset of puberty, as I discuss in my book.

Now, a newly published German study further suggests that the regular consumption of at least some phytoestrogen-rich foods may significantly decrease breast cancer risk, particularly later in life, after menopause.  In this public health study, 2,884 postmenopausal women diagnosed with breast cancer and 5,509 age-matched “controls” without breast cancer underwent detailed assessments of their dietary habits.  In addition to using a scientifically validated food-frequency questionnaire, additional specific questions regarding the consumption of phytoestrogen-rich foods were asked of all of the 8,393 women who participated in this case-control clinical study.  Importantly, the volunteers’ individual risk factors for breast cancer were assessed and accounted for when the study’s researchers analyzed their data.  This public health study appears in the current issue of the journal Nutrition and Cancer.

Among all foods known to contain phytoestrogens, three foods were found to be significantly associated with a lower risk of breast cancer among postmenopausal women.  Specifically, the regular consumption of soy foods was linked to a 17 percent reduction in breast cancer risk, while the routine intake of sunflower and pumpkin seeds was associated with a 34 percent reduction in breast cancer risk.  At the same time, the consumption of flaxseed, which contains very high levels of phytoestrogens, did not appear to be linked with a decrease in breast cancer risk in this study.

The results of this study add further evidence that at least some forms of phytoestrogens may actually decrease the risk of breast cancer, even though they are able to weakly stimulate the same hormonal receptors that estrogen normally stimulates.  While this finding may at first seem contradictory, recent research has shown that these plant-derived nutritional substances actually have rather complex effects on estrogen receptors within breast cells and other hormone-sensitive cells.  In fact, in many cases, phytoestrogens may actually block the effects of estrogen on estrogen receptors within breast cells, thus acting more like medications that are regularly used to reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence in patients with estrogen-sensitive tumors, including tamoxifen and raloxifene.

I will end my review of this new public health study by reminding readers that studies such as this one rely upon relatively weak research methods, and the findings of these types of public health studies are less compelling, in general, than “gold standard” prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical research studies.  Unfortunately, the overwhelming majority of cancer prevention research data published to date has been derived from relatively less powerful public health studies like this particular study.  However, given the enormous expense and resources necessary to perform large prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled clinical studies, and the extended period of time that is required to arrive at meaningful observations within such studies, we are left primarily with questionnaire-based public health studies such as this one in an effort to better understand potential links between diet and cancer risk.  For a much more detailed evidence-based discussion of the impact of diet and other lifestyle factors on cancer risk, purchase your copy of A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race from your favorite bookstore (available in both print and e-book formats).


At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I would also like to personally urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.

 

For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.




Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 






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Watchful Waiting (Observation) Versus Surgery for Prostate Cancer





 

A new landmark study suggests that some patients with early-stage prostate cancer can be safely observed rather than undergoing radical surgery.


 

 

WATCHFUL WAITING (OBSERVATION) VERSUS SURGERY FOR PROSTATE CANCER

In the United States, prostate cancer is the most common type of non-skin cancer occurring among men, and the second most common cause of cancer death in men.  (Lung cancer, an almost completely preventable form of cancer, sadly, remains the most common cause of cancer death for both men and women.)  The American Cancer Society estimates that, in 2012, more than 240,000 new cases of prostate cancer will be diagnosed, and more than 28,000 men will die from this form of cancer.

The debate surrounding the ideal management of early-stage prostate cancer has revolved around “watchful waiting” (observation) versus aggressive treatment with surgery or radiation therapy.  In many cases, prostate cancer is a slow-growing cancer, and when it arises in older men in particular, it seldom leads to death.  On the other hand, there are more aggressive variants of prostate cancer that spread rapidly, and these forms of prostate cancer can indeed lead to death.  The dilemma regarding which patients can be safely observed and which should be subjected to aggressive treatment has been difficult to resolve, however, because it can be difficult to determine, up front, which patients will benefit from treatment and which will not.

Last year, I reviewed a prospective randomized clinical research study from Sweden which revealed a significant improvement in survival among patients with prostate cancer who underwent prostate cancer surgery, when compared to patients who were managed with “watchful waiting”  (Prostate Cancer: Watchful Waiting Versus Surgery (Prostatectomy).)  Now, a similar new prospective randomized clinical research study provides additional important clinical information that may help doctors to identify selected prostate cancer patients who can be safely observed, thus avoiding radical cancer treatments that are associated with a high incidence of incontinence and impotence, as well as other potentially serious complications.  This new study appears in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the same journal that published last year’s Swedish prostate cancer clinical research study.

In this prospective randomized study, 731 men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer were randomly assigned to undergo radical prostate cancer surgery (prostatectomy) versus observation only.  This group of research volunteers, with an average age of 67 years, was then followed for approximately 10 years, and their outcomes were carefully monitored.  It is important to note that all of these men had early-stage prostate cancer, which appeared not to have spread outside of the prostate gland.

Following 10 years of monitoring, on average, 47 percent of the men who underwent prostatectomy died, while 50 percent of the men in the observation group died (this small difference in overall survival was not statistically significant.)  When the researchers looked at the risk of death caused specifically by prostate cancer, or due to complications associated with prostatectomy, 5.8 percent of the men in the prostatectomy group died directly as a result of either their prostate cancer or due to complications of surgery, while 8.4 percent of the men in the observation group died due to their prostate cancer, for a relative cancer-specific survival difference of 37 percent and an absolute difference of 2.6 percent in favor of the men who underwent surgery instead of observation.  Importantly, however, this observed difference in cancer-specific survival did not quite achieve statistical significance, suggesting that the cancer-specific survival benefit of radical prostatectomy in men with early-stage prostate cancer is, in general, either nonexistent or very small, at least over a 10-year period of time.

Importantly, when the authors of this study assessed prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, specifically, as a predictor of survival among the two groups of men who participated in this study, they found that prostatectomy did, in fact, significantly improve survival among men with a PSA level greater than 10 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml), compared to observation alone.

As is often the case, pundits on either side of the prostate cancer treatment debate will find some ammunition in this study’s findings to support their respective positions.  Those experts who espouse aggressive treatment for most or all early-stage prostate cancers will note the nearly 3 percent improvement in absolute survival associated with radical prostatectomy, although, in this study, this difference in absolute survival was not considered to be statistically significant.  (However, it should be noted that the observed survival advantage associated with surgery in this study would have actually been higher, and perhaps statistically significant as well, had there not been a postsurgical death of one of the patients in the prostatectomy group.)  On the other hand, proponents of “watchful waiting” will point to the very small difference in observed death rates between these two groups of patients, and the relatively large number of adverse events associated with radical prostatectomy (21 percent).  However, in my view, this study’s findings offer a reasonable, evidence-based, “middle ground” strategy, based upon patients’ PSA levels.  Specifically, for older patients who have a PSA level below 10 ng/ml and no worrisome microscopic features that suggest an aggressive variant of prostate cancer, observation may indeed be a reasonable alternative to prostatectomy, based upon the findings of this landmark study.  (Unfortunately, this study did not assess radiation therapy, which is the other common form of treatment for early-stage prostate cancer.)

In completing my review of this important clinical study, I should also note that 1 out of 5 patients who enrolled in this prospective study did not remain within their assigned groups and, therefore, crossed over into the opposite group after they entered into this study.  However, while this factor does somewhat complicate the analysis of the data collected in this study, it probably does not affect the overall accuracy of the study’s conclusions.

I do not believe that this important but admittedly imperfect study will, by itself, completely resolve the ongoing debate regarding the optimal management of early-stage prostate cancer.  However, as one of only a very few well-performed randomized prospective clinical studies that have directly compared radical surgery with observation alone, and with reasonable long-term follow-up of patients, this is a very important clinical research study for both patients and their prostate cancer physicians alike.  Because of this study, both patients and their doctors will now be better able to make individualized, evidence-based decisions regarding the likely risks and benefits of surgery versus careful observation as an initial approach to prostate cancer management.


At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.




Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 






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Fast Food, Diabetes, Heart Disease and Death






 

 

A new study attaches some shocking numbers to the risk of diabetes, heart disease and death caused by fast food.


 

 

FAST FOOD, DIABETES, HEART DISEASE AND DEATH

The United States has long been a prolific exporter of products that reflect our unique culture.  American movies, books, music, musical instruments, iPhones, iPads, automobiles, motorcycles… and fast food can all be found in all but the remotest places on the planet.  While, arguably, some these quintessentially American exports are more prized than others by global consumers, American-style fast food has become utterly ubiquitous throughout the world.

By now, almost everyone knows that deep-fried fast food is not a healthy eating choice.  Now, a newly published public health study sheds some important light on just how unhealthy American-style fast food really is.  This new clinical study appears in the current issue of the journal Circulation.

Between 1993 and 1998, more than 50,000 ethnically Chinese men and women in Singapore participated in the Singapore Chinese Health Study.  These men and women ranged in age from 45 to 74 years.  The health outcomes of these research volunteers were then followed until the end of 2009.

All of the Singaporean Chinese participants in this clinical study were thoroughly assessed with respect to their lifestyle and dietary habits.  For the purposes of this public health study, these volunteers were separated into two groups.  The first group consisted of men and women who ate a traditional low-fat Chinese-style diet.  The second group of study volunteers ate American-style fast food meals at least two times per week.  The health outcomes of these two groups of Singaporean Chinese adults were then prospectively monitored, and, ultimately, with rather dramatic findings.

When compared to the men and women who never ate fast food, the volunteers who regularly consumed fast food meals had a 27 percent higher incidence of adult-onset diabetes (type 2 diabetes mellitus).  Even more disturbing, these Singaporean Chinese fast food lovers experienced a 56 percent increase in the risk of death due to heart disease!  Moreover, these worrisome outcomes remained consistent even after adjusting for differences in overall calorie intake and body weight.  While there may or may not be genetic differences in the way that ethnic Chinese adults respond to high levels of fatty and fried foods when compared to Westerners, the links between fast food, on the one hand, and diabetes and cardiovascular disease, on the other hand, are well established in both western and eastern populations around the world.  Therefore, the findings of this innovative public health study should give all of us pause before we pull into the drive-in window of our favorite fast food restaurant!




At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.




Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 
















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New Study: Medication Errors Linked to Half of All Prescriptions








 

A new study shows that despite increased efforts by hospitals and pharmacists, half of all new prescriptions, on average, contain at least one error.


 

NEW STUDY: MEDICATION ERRORS LINKED TO HALF OF ALL PRESCRIPTIONS

The prestigious Institute of Medicine estimates that at least 1.5 million medication-related cases of injury or illness, also known as adverse drug events (ADEs), occur each year in the United States, and that, on average, hospitalized patients can expect to experience at least one medication error per day.  Because of this very large number of ADEs, and their potential to cause serious harm to patients, several strategies for reducing ADEs have been recommended, including improved communication between doctors, pharmacists and patients; the use of electronic medical records and “e-prescriptions” that incorporate medication screening software; and improved drug labeling and packaging practices.

Despite these recommended strategies for reducing ADEs, a newly published prospective, randomized, controlled clinical research study suggests that even more effective strategies need to be identified, and implemented, if we are to significantly reduce ADEs caused by medication errors.  This new clinical study appears in the current issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

In this new study, two large teaching hospitals in the United States randomized patients being discharged after admission for heart-related illnesses into one of two groups.  One group, the “control” group, had their discharge medications prescribed and monitored in the usual manner.  The other group, the “intervention” group, had their discharge medications managed using an enhanced approach to medication prescribing and monitoring, including having a pharmacist directly review patients’ preadmission and discharge medications, one-to-one patient counseling by a pharmacist regarding their medications while patients were still in the hospital, the provision of extra counseling and assistance for patients with literacy challenges, and individual patient follow-up by telephone after their discharge from the hospital.  All patients in the intervention group were provided these enhanced services for 30 days from the date of their discharge by these two well known academic medical centers.

The results of this important prospective clinical study were, unfortunately, rather discouraging.  Among the 851 volunteers who participated in this study, 432, or 51 percent, experienced one or more clinically significant medication-related errors, 23 percent of which were assessed to be serious errors, and 2 percent of which were considered to be life-threatening errors.  Regarding ADEs, specifically, 30 percent of the patients in this study were confirmed to have experienced an adverse physical reaction or complication associated with their medications, while another 30 percent experienced abnormal symptoms or side effects that were deemed to be “potential” ADEs.  When the researchers compared the two groups of patient volunteers in this study, they found that the intervention group patients, who had received extra medication prescribing and monitoring safeguards, had the same incidence of overall medication errors and confirmed ADEs as the control group patients, unfortunately.

The findings of this clinical study are, needless to say, very disappointing.  Despite the best efforts of these two large teaching hospitals in taking multiple extra measures to drive down the number of medication errors and ADEs, these enhanced efforts appeared to have had no significant beneficial effects.  Indeed, half of the patients participating in this clinical research study experienced one or more medication errors, and proactive health-literacy-directed and pharmacist-delivered interventions appeared to have no impact on this very high incidence of medication-related errors.  (You can also bet that the incidence of medication errors and ADEs are likely to be much higher in many hospitals and pharmacies that are not closely following their patients within a rigorous prospective clinical research study, such as this study.)

The findings of this important prospective clinical study strongly suggest that currently available recommendations for addressing the ongoing high rate of medication-related errors and ADEs are likely to be inadequate, particularly for patients who are transitioning from the hospital to home.  This study’s results also indicate that additional new strategies need to be quickly identified and implemented.  At this time, I urge all patients to proactively review both their current and new prescriptions with their health care providers, and with their pharmacists, in an effort to detect potentially serious medication-related errors before they can cause any ADEs.  Moreover, every one of us who take medications (including vitamins and supplements) should carry an updated list of all medications, and a list of any allergies or sensitivities to medications, with us at all times.



At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.





Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 













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Obesity, Diet, Exercise, Estrogen, Testosterone and Breast Cancer Risk






 

New research confirms suspected links between obesity, estrogen and testosterone levels, and exercise on breast cancer risk.


 

 

OBESITY, DIET, EXERCISE, ESTROGEN, TESTOSTERONE AND BREAST CANCER RISK

Last week, I discussed new research linking even relatively modest levels of regular physical activity with a reduced risk of developing breast cancer (Even Modest Levels of Physical Activity Decrease Breast Cancer Risk).  This week, I will present a newly published clinical research study that may help to explain the well known links between obesity, weight loss, and breast cancer risk.  This new research study appears in the current issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

There is ample evidence that obesity is, by itself, a risk factor for breast cancer, and that the loss of excess weight can reduce obesity-associated breast cancer risk.  Similarly, a woman’s lifetime level of exposure to the female sex hormone estrogen (as well as to testosterone) has also been linked to breast cancer risk.

After menopause, the ovaries no longer produce estrogen.  However, fat cells continue to produce estrogen (and to metabolize testosterone into estrogen), and the link between obesity and breast cancer has, therefore, been presumed to be due to increased estrogen production from fat cells in the bodies of overweight and obese women.  Based upon the findings of this new clinical study, the presumed biological mechanism whereby loss of excess weight reduces breast cancer risk appears to have been confirmed.

In this prospective, randomized, controlled clinical study, obese, sedentary postmenopausal women (ages 50 to 75 years) were randomized into one of four different groups.  The first group was placed on a reduced calorie diet.  The second group engaged in a supervised moderate-to-vigorous aerobic exercise program.  The third group underwent both dieting and a supervised exercise program.  Finally, the fourth group of women served as a “control” group, and these women did not engage in either dieting or exercise.  Blood levels of estrogen and testosterone were measured in all of these women at the beginning and end of this 12-month study.

Compared with the women in the “control” group, estrogen levels decreased by 16 percent with dieting alone, by 5 percent with exercise alone, and by more than 20 percent when dieting was combined with moderate-to-vigorous exercise.  Similarly, testosterone levels declined by 10 percent with dieting alone, and by almost 16 percent when dieting was combined with exercise.  Moreover, greater levels of weight loss were associated with greater decreases in estrogen and testosterone levels.

The findings of this innovative clinical research study lend considerable weight to the longstanding theory that obesity increases breast cancer risk by raising estrogen and testosterone levels in postmenopausal women, while the loss of excess weight decreases breast cancer risk due to reductions in obesity-related elevated levels of estrogen and testosterone.  While there are, doubtless, other biological mechanisms involved, this clinical study adds considerable weight to the data that I discuss in my bestselling book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, linking diet, obesity and exercise (along with other modifiable lifestyle factors) to breast cancer risk.

As our society becomes progressively more obese and sedentary, the incidence of cancer and other serious obesity-related diseases is expected to continue to climb.  If you are significantly overweight, or if you lead a “couch potato” lifestyle, then please meet with your doctor and a personal trainer, and get started on a sensible diet program (as I describe in my book) and exercise program.




At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.




Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity



 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author



 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 






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