Broccoli (Isothiocyanates) May Reduce Breast Cancer Risk





 

A new laboratory study suggests that isothiocyanates in broccoli, and other cruciferous vegetables, may significantly decrease breast cancer risk.


 

 

BROCCOLI (ISOTHIOCYANATES) MAY REDUCE BREAST CANCER RISK

As I discuss in my bestselling book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, cruciferous (brassica) vegetables, including broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts and cabbage, are rich in compounds known as isothiocyanates.  These compounds have been shown to have several different anti-cancer effects in laboratory studies, and against multiple different types of cancer.   A newly published laboratory research study, which appears in the current issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, suggests that dietary isothiocyanates may be particularly active against breast cancer.

In this new study, laboratory mice prone to developing breast cancer similar to human breast cancers were divided into two groups.  One group (the “experimental” group) received phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) as a dietary supplement, while the other group of mice (the “control” group) did not receive this supplement.  The results of this study were rather dramatic.

In the group of mice that received the PEITC supplement, only 19 percent developed breast cancer, whereas 40 percent of the mice in the control group developed breast cancer.  Among all mice that did go on to develop breast cancer, dietary supplementation with PEITC was associated with a 56 percent reduction in the size of breast tumors, as measured under a microscope.  Moreover, dietary isothiocyanates appeared to reduce the risk of breast cancer, and the size of breast tumors, through multiple different biological mechanisms, including decreased growth and reproduction of tumor cells, decreased growth of new blood vessels necessary to support growing tumors, and increased cancer cell death through a mechanism known as apoptosis.

The findings of this laboratory study revealed multiple and rather profound actions of isothiocyanate against cancer cells and tumors in mice prone to developing human-like breast cancers.  Of course, what works in laboratory mice does not always work in human beings, unfortunately.  At this time, however, there are 7 active human clinical trials looking at isothiocyanates in the prevention and treatment of various types of cancer.  Meanwhile, Mom’s advice to eat your broccoli may turn out to have been very good advice indeed!

 

At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I would also like to personally urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.


For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!


Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.




Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 





Bookmark and Share





































Post to Twitter

Cruciferous Vegetables and Prostate Cancer Risk

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”



CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES AND PROSTATE CANCER RISK

Isothiocyanates are a class of dietary compounds that are found in most cruciferous (“brassica”) vegetables. (Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts, kale, cabbage, kohlrabi, chinese broccoli, broccoli rabe, collard greens, turnip greens, bok choy, rutabaga, arugula, radish, and watercress.) Isothiocyanates, which are partially responsible for the bitter, sulfurous taste of many cruciferous vegetables, have been extensively studied as potential cancer prevention agents. Among the cancers that dietary isothiocyanates may help to prevent is prostate cancer (the most common type of cancer among men).

A newly published laboratory research study, which appears in the current issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, suggests that dietary isothiocyanates may indeed reduce the risk of developing prostate cancer. In this study, laboratory mice that are predisposed to developing prostate cancer were divided into two groups. The “experimental” group of mice was fed a diet supplemented with phenethyl isothiocyanate (3 µnol per gram), while the “control” group of mice was fed a standard commercial mouse diet without added phenethyl isothiocyanate. After 19 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and microscopic evaluation of their prostate glands was performed.

After extensive testing of the prostate glands of these male mice, it was discovered that the mice that were fed the phenethyl isothiocyanate supplement were 36 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer when compared to the mice in the “control” group. Moreover, among those mice, in both groups, that did go on to develop prostate cancer, the mice in the “experimental” group had tumors that were 26 percent smaller than the mice in the “control” group. Importantly, no toxic side effects were observed among the mice that received the phenethyl isothiocyanate supplement.

The findings of this particular laboratory research study are consistent with the findings of multiple other laboratory studies, and suggest that cruciferous vegetables may decrease the risk of prostate cancer, as well as other cancers. Moreover, there are numerous other laboratory studies that have identified specific mechanisms whereby isothiocyanates alter specific genetic and biochemical pathways that are known to be involved in the development of prostate cancer (and other types of cancer, as well).

While research studies involving laboratory mice or rats cannot directly prove that cruciferous vegetables, or isothiocyanate supplements, can actually reduce the risk of prostate cancer in humans, previous clinical research studies have suggested that a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables may, at a minimum, significantly reduce the risk of aggressive forms of prostate cancer in humans.

 

For a complete evidence-based discussion regarding a potential role for cruciferous vegetables and isothiocyanates as part of an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race. For the price of a cheeseburger, fries, and a shake, you can purchase this landmark new book, in both paperback and e-book formats, and begin living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle today!


On Thanksgiving Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books! On Christmas Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.com “Top 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list!

 


Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link:

Texas Blues Jam


I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month. (More than 1.2 million health-conscious people visited Weekly Health Update in 2010!) As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.




Bookmark and Share



 

 

Post to Twitter

Cruciferous Vegetables, Soy & Breast Cancer Risk

April 11, 2010 by  
Filed under Weekly Health Update

 

Welcome to Weekly Health Update



“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers” 

CRUCIFEROUS VEGETABLES, SOY & BREAST CANCER RISK

 

The role of soybean-derived isoflavones in cancer prevention is not entirely clear at this time.  However, there has been intense interest in tofu, and other soy-derived foods, as potential breast cancer prevention agents.  At the same time, because genistein, and other soy isoflavones, are known to variably act as both inhibitors and mimics of estrogen (the primary female sex hormone), cancer experts remain divided regarding the safety of regularly consuming soy isoflavones by women who are at an increased risk of developing breast cancer (chronic estrogen stimulation of the breast is a known risk factor for breast cancer).  Meanwhile, the high level of tofu consumption among women in the Far East, coupled with the much lower incidence of breast cancer in those countries when compared to the United States and other western countries, has fuelled speculation that tofu and other soy-derived foods may actually be associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer. 

In addition to soy isoflavones, there is also research data available suggesting that the frequent consumption of cruciferous vegetables, like broccoli and cauliflower, may also be associated with a decreased risk of at least some types of cancer, including breast cancer.

A newly published public health study from Singapore evaluated the impact of the regular intake of vegetables, fruit, and soy-derived foods on the risk of breast cancer within the large Chinese population in that country.  This enormous prospective epidemiological study, which began in 1993, and which appears in the current issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, included more than 34,000 women volunteers.  All of the 34,018 women in this study underwent detailed evaluation of their diets when they entered into this prospective public health study.  Among this very large group of women, 629 new cases of breast cancer were diagnosed during the course of this ongoing study. 

Based upon their self-reported dietary patterns, the women participating in this large epidemiological study were divided into two groups.  The first group consisted of women who regularly consumed cruciferous vegetables, fruit, and tofu.  The second group of women generally favored meat and starchy foods (such as dim sum), and consumed far fewer portions of vegetables, fruit, and tofu when compared to the first group.

The results of this study indicated that increasing levels of vegetable, fruit and tofu intake were associated with a significant decrease in breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women.   Among the women reporting the highest levels of intake of these foods, there was, on average, a 30 percent reduction in the risk of breast cancer when compared to the women who rarely ate these healthy foods.  Moreover, among the postmenopausal women who frequently consumed vegetables, fruit, and tofu, and who were observed for 5 or more years in this study, the apparent reduction in the risk of breast cancer grew even stronger, and these women were found to be 43 percent less likely to develop breast cancer when compared to women who rarely consumed vegetables, fruit, and tofu in their diets.

Therefore, in this large diet survey-based, prospective public health study,  a diet rich in vegetables (and cruciferous vegetables, such as broccoli and cauliflower, in particular), fruit, and tofu was strongly associated with a significant reduction in breast cancer risk in postmenopausal Chinese women living in Singapore.

Although there remains some concern that soy isoflavones may, under some conditions, actually stimulate the growth of either new or previous breast cancers (or cancers of the ovary or uterus), this public health study’s favorable findings are additive to a growing body of research data suggesting that both cruciferous vegetables and soy-derived isoflavones may be associated with a substantial decrease in the risk of breast cancer in women. 

 

To learn more about the potential role of cruciferous vegetables and soy isoflavones as part of a cancer prevention lifestyle, look for the publication of my new landmark evidence-based book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” in the summer of this year.



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Tdv7XW0qg



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would like to take this opportunity to thank the nearly 120,000 new and returning readers who visited our premier global health information website last month.  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can. 


In view of the extreme devastation and human misery brought about in Haiti and Chile by the recent earthquakes, Weekly Health Update asks our tens of thousands of caring readers to give generously to established charities that are currently working in those countries to assist the injured, the ill, and the homeless.  There are many such legitimate charities, including the following two:

http://www.redcross.org/

http://www.imcworldwide.org/haiti 


 

Bookmark and Share


Post to Twitter

Better Tag Cloud