Vitamin D Improves Both HDL Levels and Weight Loss



A new prospective randomized clinical study showed that Vitamin D supplements increased levels of the HDL (“good cholesterol”) and improved weight loss.


 

 

VITAMIN D IMPROVES BOTH HDL LEVELS AND WEIGHT LOSS

Many health claims have been made for Vitamin D, although very few such claims have been well substantiated by high quality research studies.

In my bestselling book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, I exhaustively review and discuss the available scientific data supporting Vitamin D as a potential cancer prevention nutrient.  However, other health claims have also been made for Vitamin D, aside from cancer prevention.  For example, there is some research data available suggesting that low levels of Vitamin D in the blood may be associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease.  As with most disease prevention research, though, much of the data supporting this claim for Vitamin D is based upon rather weak methods of clinical research, and there is very little “gold standard” prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical research data available that confirms a role for Vitamin D in cardiovascular disease prevention.  However, a newly published prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded clinical study, which appears in the current issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, adds further support for Vitamin D as a protective factor against cardiovascular disease, particularly among overweight and obese women.

In this new study, 77 otherwise healthy overweight or obese women were secretly randomized to receive either 1,000 International Units (25 micrograms) of Vitamin D per day or a daily placebo (sugar) pill for a period of 12 weeks.  Both groups of patient volunteers were then tested throughout the course of this study, including measurements of their blood pressure, blood cholesterol levels, and weight.  Food intake and physical activity levels were also monitored throughout the course of this clinical research study.

At the end of the study, the blood level of HDL cholesterol (the so-called “good cholesterol”) was found to have significantlyincreased in the group of women who had been secretly randomized to receive daily Vitamin D supplements for 12 weeks.  Similarly, the blood levels of apolipoprotein A-I, which also reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease (and which makes up part of the HDL molecule), was also noted to be significantly higher in the group of women who had received Vitamin D supplements, when compared to the women in the placebo control group.  (Moreover, the levels of both HDL and apolipoprotein A-I were noted to have actually decreased, over time, in the group of women who received only daily placebo pills.)

Finally, in this group of overweight and obese women, 12 weeks of daily Vitamin D supplementation was also associated with an average weight loss of just over 5 pounds (2.7 kilograms), whereas the women in the placebo control group lost less than one pound (0.4 kilogram) during the 12 week course of this study.  Interestingly, the enhanced weight loss that was observed in the Vitamin D group was not associated with any differences in the level of physical activity between the two groups of women in this study.

The rather dramatic results of this prospective, randomized, doubled-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical study, therefore, showed that, at least among overweight and obese women, daily Vitamin D supplementation for 12 weeks was associated with heart-healthy improvements in HDL and apolipoprotein A-I levels, as well as significant weight loss.  Although this study included a rather small group of patient volunteers, and should therefore be repeated with a larger cohort of patients, the fact that this study was conducted according to “gold standard” methods of clinical research further adds to the credibility of its findings.  (Whether or not similar improvements in HDL and apolipoprotein A-I levels can be achieved by Vitamin D supplements in non-overweight or non-obese women, or in men, was not addressed by this clinical study.  However, other human and animal studies have suggested that Vitamin D deficiency may, indeed, be associated with lower HDL and apolipoprotein A-I levels in both males and females.)

As excessive levels of Vitamin D can lead to significant health problems, including nausea, vomiting, dehydration, kidney stones, kidney failure, and ulcers of the GI tract, I strongly recommend that you see your physician first if you choose to start taking Vitamin D supplements.

For more information regarding the potential cancer prevention effects of Vitamin D, order your copy of my evidence-based book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, today!



For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books.  Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.


Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


For a lighthearted perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link:

Texas Blues Jam


I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (More than 1.3 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious people who visited Weekly Health Update in 2011!)  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 






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Green Tea Significantly Reduces LDL (Bad Cholesterol)

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”



 

GREEN TEA SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCES LDL (BAD CHOLESTEROL)

The cultivation and consumption of tea has continued, uninterrupted, for at least 12,000 years, based upon documentation from China.  Today, tea is the most commonly consumed beverage throughout the world other than water.  As I discuss in detail in my recent book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race, a lot of health claims have been made for green tea, including a decrease in the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease.  However, the available clinical and laboratory research data for green tea, unfortunately, includes multiple contradictory findings for these and other health-related claims.

As with most of the available disease prevention research that has been published so far, the majority of research data supporting beneficial health effects for green tea has been in the form of public health studies that rely upon dietary surveys or other research methodologies that produce low-level clinical research data. For this reason, new clinical research studies that rely upon prospective, randomized methods of conducting research, and which generate more valid and predictive data than survey-based studies, are essential in order to better understand the potential health benefits of green tea, if any.

A newly published paper in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition offers important information about the potential health benefits of green tea, based upon a comprehensive analysis of all previously published prospective randomized clinical research trials looking at the effects of green tea consumption on blood lipids (e.g., total cholesterol; LDL-cholesterol, also known as the “bad cholesterol;” and HDL-cholesterol, also known as the “good cholesterol”). A total of 14 prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical research studies were identified and analyzed in this comprehensive meta-analysis.

In this meta-analysis, green tea consumption, in the form of either a tea beverage or a green tea extract, was found to significantly and consistently reduce blood levels of total cholesterol (by an average of 7.2 mg/dL) and LDL-cholesterol (by an average of 2.2 mg/dL). At the same time, green tea consumption did not significantly affect blood levels of HDL-cholesterol (the “good cholesterol”). Thus, this important meta-analysis study provides powerful, high-level research evidence that green tea does indeed significantly lower total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels. These effects of green tea on total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels are the same primary effects of the enormously popular statin drugs, and which have been shown to significantly reduce the incidence of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack, sudden cardiac death, and stroke.

This is a powerful research study on the effects of green tea consumption on lipid profiles, because it is based solely upon data from high-level research studies, rather than the much more commonly published (and less expensive) survey-based public health studies that make up the majority of research in disease prevention.  I have, for many years now, included green tea in my diet, and while the impact of green tea, if any, on cancer risk is still open to debate, studies such as this one provide compelling evidence that the regular consumption of green tea may be an important part of a cardiovascular disease prevention lifestyle.



For a comprehensive guide to living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race.  For the price of a cheeseburger, fries, and a shake, you can purchase this landmark new book, in both paperback and e-book formats, and begin living an evidence-based cancer prevention lifestyle today!

For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my new book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million,Vroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

On Thanksgiving Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books! On Christmas Day, 2010, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list!


Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity



Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link:

Texas Blues Jam



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month. (More than 1.2 million health-conscious people visited Weekly Health Update in 2010!) As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.





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Blueberries, Obesity, Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome

 

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”


BLUBERRIES, OBESITY, DIABETES AND METABOLIC SYNDROME

Metabolic syndrome includes a constellation of health disorders that are associated with a high risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease.  Specific disorders that are associated with metabolic syndrome include high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood, obesity, and diabetes (or “pre-diabetes”).  In the United States, where obesity has become an epidemic, public health experts estimate that as much as 25 percent of the population currently meets the criteria for metabolic syndrome.

Excessive calorie intake, a sedentary lifestyle, obesity in the abdominal and waist areas (central, or visceral, obesity), genetic factors, and other adverse health risks are known to contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome.  Therefore, both the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome are based upon exercise, a healthy low-fat and low-sugar/low-carb diet, and weight loss.  A new prospective, randomized clinical research study suggests that consuming blueberries may also help to reduce some of the adverse health risks associated with metabolic syndrome.

In this study, which appears in the current issue of The Journal of Nutrition, 48 adults (44 females and 4 males) with metabolic syndrome were divided into two groups.  One group, the “experimental group,” consumed 50 grams of freeze-dried blueberries per day (equivalent to 350 grams of fresh blueberries per day), in the form of a beverage, for a period of 8 weeks.  The other group, the “control group,” consumed a “placebo” beverage that did not contain any blueberries (also for 8 weeks).  Blood pressure checks and multiple blood tests were performed at both 4 weeks and 8 weeks into the study.

When comparing the two groups of patient volunteers, the patients in the “blueberry group” were found to have significantly greater decreases in their high blood pressure when compared to the control group.  The level of oxidized LDL cholesterol in the blood, which is a form of the “bad” LDL cholesterol that can directly damage the lining of arteries throughout the body (atherosclerosis), was also significantly decreased in the “blueberry group” of patient volunteers.  At the same time, there were no significant differences between the two groups of patient volunteers with respect to blood glucose (sugar) levels, triglyceride levels, or the levels of HDL (the “good” cholesterol) or LDL (the “bad” cholesterol) in the blood .

Therefore, while a brief period of a diet supplemented with blueberries did not reverse all of the abnormalities associated with metabolic syndrome, the consumption of the equivalent of about 350 grams of blueberries each day did appear to significantly improve at least two of the adverse health factors associated with this syndrome (i.e., high blood pressure and blood levels of oxidized LDL cholesterol).  Based upon the intriguing findings of this small and short-duration study, patients with one or more health factors associated with metabolic syndrome might consider adding some blueberries to their daily diet, in addition to the standard treatment for this life-threatening disorder!

 

For more information on blueberries, and other sources of dietary polyphenols, as part of a cancer prevention lifestyle, watch for the publication of my new landmark evidence-based book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” in September of this year.



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author


For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Tdv7XW0qg



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit our premier global health information website every month.  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.



 

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High LDL Cholesterol in Young Adults and Heart Disease Risk in Middle Age

 

Welcome to Weekly Health Update


“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”


HIGH LDL CHOLESTEROL IN YOUNG ADULTS AND HEART DISEASE IN MIDDLE AGE

Most young adults look upon heart disease as an “old person’s” disease, and many young people therefore assume that they do not need to be concerned with their diet, or with their cholesterol profile, during this early stage of their adult lives.  However, a newly published prospective public health study, which appears in the current issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, should certainly cause young adults to reconsider the relevance of these two very important health-related factors to them.

In this study, 3,258 men and women between the ages of 18 and 30 enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study between 1985 and 1986.  All of these research volunteers underwent blood tests for LDL cholesterol (the “bad cholesterol”), HDL cholesterol (the “good cholesterol”), and triglycerides (fat in the blood, which is also linked to cardiovascular disease risk).  Subsequently, these blood lipid tests were repeated throughout the 20-year course of this prospective public health research study.  Twenty years later, these now middle-aged adults underwent special scans of their hearts in order to detect and quantify calcium deposits in their coronary arteries (the “coronary calcium score” is used to predict a patient’s risk of experiencing future cardiac events like angina or heart attack).

The findings of this study are cause for considerable concern.  First of all, fully 87 percent of these volunteers were found to already have one or more abnormalities in their HDL, LDL or/and triglyceride levels, which are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.  Thus, nearly 90 percent of these young adults, who were recruited into this research study from nearby communities at 4 different locations in the United States, already had abnormal blood lipid test results at the time they entered into this clinical study!

After 20 years of observation, coronary calcium scores were obtained on each of these more than 3,000 study participants.  Once again, the results were striking (and concerning).  When the average LDL levels of these study volunteers were compared with their calcium scores, it quickly became apparent that elevation of LDL levels in the blood during young adulthood is associated with a rising and significant risk of coronary artery disease during middle age (based upon coronary calcium score results).  Among the volunteers who maintained normal LDL levels (<70 mg/dL, or <1.81 mmol/L) during their young adult years, there was an 8 percent incidence of coronary artery calcification (coronary artery atherosclerosis) 20 years later.   However, among the patients with elevated average LDL levels (160 mg/dL or higher, or 4.14 mmol/L or higher), the incidence of coronary artery disease was 44 percent. 

Even relatively mild increases in LDL levels during young adulthood were found, in this study, to be associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease in mid-life.  When compared to patients with LDL levels <70 mg/dL (<1.81 mmol/L), patients with LDL levels of 70 to 99 mg/dL (1.81 to 2.56 mmol/L) were 50 percent more likely to have detectable coronary artery disease.  Patients with LDL levels between 100 and 129 mg/dL (2.59 to 3.34 mmol/L) were found have a 140 percent increased risk of coronary artery calcifications.  Patients with LDL levels between 130 and 159 mg/dL (3.37 to 4.12 mmol/L) experienced a 230 percent increased risk of developing coronary artery disease in middle age.  Finally, those patients with LDL levels of 160 mg/dl or higher (4.14 mmol/L or higher) had a whopping 460 percent increase in the risk of developing coronary artery disease by the time they reached middle age!

While the finding of coronary artery calcifications in these volunteers does not mean that every one of them will go on to experience heart attacks, or other serious complications of coronary artery disease, coronary artery calcium deposits (due to atherosclerosis) have been proven to significantly increase the risk of angina and heart attack, as well as other complications of cardiovascular disease.

This is a powerful public health study, because of its long-term follow-up of a relatively large group of patient volunteers.   Its findings tell us at least two very important things that we all should know regarding the risk of developing cardiovascular disease during middle age.  The first is that a strikingly large majority of young adults in the United States are already overweight, and already have abnormal blood lipid levels (and which are known to be associated with an increased lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease).  Secondly, even relatively mild increases in the level of LDL cholesterol in the blood during early adulthood are associated with a significant increase in the likelihood of having heart disease by middle age.  Moreover, significantly elevated LDL levels, over time, are associated with a huge increase in the risk of developing coronary artery disease by mid-life.

Based upon the findings of this important study, it is may be necessary to revisit the recommended age at which the routine annual testing of LDL cholesterol levels is initiated, particularly for young adults who are obese, or who have a family history of cardiovascular disease.  I also cannot stress enough the direct linkages that exist between diet and weight, on the one hand, and LDL cholesterol levels on the other had.  We are facing a true epidemic of obesity in this country, with two-thirds of the population already categorized as overweight or obese (and the proportion of the American population that is overweight or obese continues to rise every year).  The results of this study add to other prior research data regarding the lifetime health effects of poor lifestyle and diet choices, even when these poor choices are made during the very early years of our adult lives.

 

For a disturbing look at the links between obesity and cancer risk, watch for the publication of my new landmark evidence-based book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” in late August of this year.



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author


For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Tdv7XW0qg



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit our premier global health information website every month.  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.



 

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Coffee Improves HDL Cholesterol Levels

April 18, 2010 by  
Filed under Weekly Health Update

Welcome to Weekly Health Update



“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”

COFFEE IMPROVES HDL CHOLESTEROL LEVELS

Coffee is the second most commonly traded commodity in the world (following oil), and is widely consumed around the world as the second most popular beverage (after water). It is estimated that the coffee industry generates some $60 billion in revenue every year.

In the United States, coffee drinkers consume an average of 3 cups of this caffeine-loaded beverage each day. (Slightly more than 50 percent of Americans drink coffee on a daily basis, while another 30 percent of the population drinks coffee on an occasional basis.)

Many health claims have been for coffee, although few have withstood the scrutiny of serious research. However, previous research studies have suggested that regular coffee consumption may reduce inflammation in the body, and increase HDL levels (HDL is also known as “the good cholesterol”). A newly published clinical research study, in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, has evaluated these claims, and the results of this research study will be of considerable interest to coffee lovers everywhere.

In this study, 47 volunteers who regularly consumed coffee were evaluated. During the first month of this study, these research volunteers refrained from drinking coffee. During the second month of this study, each volunteer consumed 4 cups of filtered coffee per day (each cup contained 150 ml of coffee). Finally, during the third month of this study, each volunteer consumed a nerve-jangling 8 cups of filtered coffee per day! Blood samples were collected throughout this research study, and were tested for total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (the “bad cholesterol”), and caffeine, as well as for several markers of inflammation.

In this study, the regular daily consumption of 8 cups of coffee per day was found to significantly reduce the blood levels of several proteins associated with chronic inflammation (by as much as 16 percent, when compared to no coffee consumption). Moreover, HDL cholesterol levels increased by 7 percent during the final phase of this study (when compared to the “no coffee” first phase), when the research volunteers were consuming 8 cups of coffee per day (and the ratio between LDL cholesterol and HDL cholesterol decreased by 8 percent during the final phase of this study). At the same time, although previous research has suggested that coffee consumption may improve glucose control in diabetics, there was no evidence of improved glucose metabolism or blood-glucose levels with increasing coffee intake in this particular study.

Therefore, this intriguing little prospective clinical research study revealed that drinking 8 cups of coffee per day appeared to decrease the level of inflammation-associated proteins in the body, while also increasing levels of heart-healthy HDL cholesterol in the blood. However, this small and brief study cannot answer the very important question of whether or not these observed biochemical changes in the blood will actually translate into improved health. Nonetheless, this study’s finding that HDL cholesterol levels increase with regular daily coffee intake may indeed be good news for folks with mildly-to-moderately decreased HDL levels. Longer term prospective clinical studies will be necessary, however, to quantify the actual health benefit, if any, of regular coffee consumption.

 

To learn more about the critical role of diet as part of a cancer prevention lifestyle, look for the publication of my new landmark evidence-based book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” in the summer of this year.






Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity



Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link:


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Tdv7XW0qg



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would like to take this opportunity to thank the nearly 120,000 new and returning readers who visited our premier global health information website last month. As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.



In view of the extreme devastation and human misery brought about in Haiti and Chile by the recent earthquakes, Weekly Health Update asks our tens of thousands of caring readers to give generously to established charities that are currently working in those countries to assist the injured, the ill, and the homeless.  There are many such legitimate charities, including the following two:


http://www.imcworldwide.org/haiti

http://www.redcross.org/




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Walnuts, Cholesterol, LDL & Triglycerides

March 7, 2010 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

 

Welcome to Weekly Health Update



  “A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers” 


WALNUTS, CHOLESTEROL, LDL & TRIGLYCERIDES

Walnuts are rich in anti-inflammatory nutrients, including omega-3 fatty acids and ellagic acid.   Previous research has shown that the regular consumption of walnuts appears to improve cardiovascular function following high-fat meals.  In diabetics, who face an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, walnuts also appear to improve cardiovascular function.

A newly published prospective, randomized clinical research trial, which appears in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, evaluated the effects of a walnut-supplemented diet on 87 adults with normal-to-high cholesterol levels in their blood.  This study used a “crossover” approach, in which all of the patient volunteers received walnut supplements for 6 months, and were then switched to a walnut-free diet for another 6 months.  During this 12-month study, blood tests were performed at the beginning of the study, and then at 4, 6, 10 and 12 months into the study.  Because of the crossover design of this study, the researchers were able to directly compare the effects of walnut supplementation on body weight, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol (the “bad cholesterol”), HDL cholesterol (the “good cholesterol”), and fatty acids (triglycerides).  (Together, these compounds are referred to as “lipids.”)

As has been observed in previous clinical studies of shorter duration, this study found that a 6-month period of walnut supplementation resulted in significant reductions in total cholesterol and triglyceride levels.  LDL levels were also reduced, although this finding just barely failed to reach statistical significance.  Importantly, these favorable changes in blood lipid levels were found to be more pronounced in patients with elevated total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels.  (I should note that significant reductions in LDL blood levels have been observed in response to adding walnuts to the diet of patients with elevated LDL levels, in other studies.)

While statins, and other lipid-lowering drugs, have revolutionized the management of elevated cholesterol and triglycerides, and have been shown to significantly reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (and death due to cardiovascular disease), not all patients with hyperlipidemia can tolerate these drugs.  Moreover, as with all medications, these lipid-lowering drugs are not equally effective in all patients, and many patients with hyperlipidemia will continue to have elevated LDL cholesterol and/or triglyceride levels despite taking lipid-lowering drugs.

Studies such as this one suggest that the addition of walnuts to one’s diet may be a useful adjunct in lowering elevated LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels.  (As always, I encourage everyone to check with their doctor before making any significant alterations in their diet, especially if you have one or more chronic illnesses.)


For a detailed and comprehensive evaluation of the role of nuts, omega-3 fatty acids, ellagic acid, and other dietary modifications, as part of a cancer prevention lifestyle, look for the publication of my new book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” in the spring of this year.
 


In view of the extreme devastation and human misery brought about in Haiti and Chile by the recent earthquakes, Weekly Health Update asks our tens of thousands of caring readers to give generously to established charities that are currently working in those countries to assist the injured, the ill, and the homeless.  There are many such legitimate charities, including the following two:

http://www.redcross.org/

http://www.imcworldwide.org/haiti


Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Tdv7XW0qg



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would like to take this opportunity to thank the nearly 120,000 new and returning readers who visited our premier global health information website last month.  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can. 

 

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