Fish Oil Improves Memory, Reduces Diabetes and Heart Disease Risk Factors



Fish Oil Improves Memory, Reduces Diabetes and Heart Disease Risk Factors


 

 

 

FISH OIL IMPROVES MEMORY, REDUCES DIABETES AND HEART DISEASE RISK FACTORS

Fish oil, which is rich in anti-inflammatory omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, can play an important role in maintaining cardiovascular health.  There is also research data available to suggest that regular supplements of fish oil may improve brain function, including memory, in older patients.  Now, a recently published research paper, which appears in the Nutrition Journal, provides strong evidence that fish oil supplements can indeed improve cognitive function, while simultaneously reducing risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

In this study, 40 healthy middle-aged and elderly research volunteers underwent initial evaluation, including blood tests and cognitive function testing.  In this “placebo-controlled crossover” study, the volunteers were randomly divided into two groups.  One group received 3 grams of fish oil per day, while the other group received a placebo (sugar) pill.  After 5 weeks, the two groups of research volunteers were retested, and were then switched, or “crossed over,” with respect to the fish oil supplements and placebo pills.  After 5 additional weeks, the research volunteers were all once again retested.

Retesting of these research volunteers showed a significant improvement in memory function after taking fish oil for 5 weeks (when compared to the volunteers who were taking placebo pills).  Moreover, fish oil supplementation was also associated with a lower level of fat (triglycerides) in the blood, lower blood pressure, lower blood sugar levels, and a decrease in the level of the inflammatory protein TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor-alpha).

Taken together, the findings of this clinical study identified several apparent health benefits associated with daily fish oil supplements in middle-aged and elderly research volunteers, including improved memory function and improvements in multiple known risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

 

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Dr. Wascher’s latest video:

Dark as Night, Part 1


Dark as Night, Part 1

Dark as Night, Part 1


At this time, more than 8 percent of Americans are unemployed.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, however, the unemployment rate for veterans who served on active duty between September 2001 and December 2011 is now more than 12 percent.  A new website, Veterans in Healthcare, seeks to connect veterans with potential employers.  If you are a veteran who works in the healthcare field, or if you are an employer who is looking for physicians, advanced practice professionals, nurses, corpsmen/medics, or other healthcare professionals, then please take a look at Veterans in Healthcare. As a retired veteran of the U.S. Army, I would also like to personally urge you to hire a veteran whenever possible.

For a groundbreaking overview of cancer risks, and evidence-based strategies to reduce your risk of developing cancer, order your copy of my bestselling book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from AmazonBarnes & NobleBooks-A-MillionVroman’s Bookstore, and other fine bookstores!

Within one week of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was ranked #6 among all cancer-related books on the Amazon.com “Top 100 Bestseller’s List” for Kindle e-books. Within three months of publication, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race was the #1 book on the Amazon.comTop 100 New Book Releases in Cancer” list.




Disclaimer:  As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


 

Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, professor of surgery, cancer researcher, oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people from around the world who visit this premier global health information website every month.  Over the past 12 months, more than 2.4 million pages of high-quality medical research findings were served to the worldwide audience of health-conscious readers.  As always, we enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.


 


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Fruits and Vegetables Improve Memory

 

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“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”


FRUITS AND VEGETABLES IMPROVE MEMORY

A diet rich in fruits and vegetables, and low in meat and other animal products, has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of those top two killers, cardiovascular disease and cancer.  Now, a newly published public health study, from Norway, suggests eating your fruits and veggies may also be good for your brain, as well.

In this study, which appears in the current issue of the British Journal of Nutrition, 2,013 research volunteers between the ages of 70 and 74 underwent extensive cognitive testing and evaluation of their dietary habits. 

Overall, memory and other higher cognitive functions were significantly improved among those patient volunteers who consumed the most fruits, vegetables, whole grain products, and mushrooms.  Among these foods, the frequent intake of both fruits and vegetables (up to 500 grams per day) was, specifically, linked to the highest level of cognitive function in these older men and women.

Further study of dietary preferences revealed that cruciferous vegetables (e.g., broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, bok choy, among others), carrots, citrus fruits, and whole-grain breads were the foods most closely associated with improved cognitive function.  (On the other hand, white bread consumption was associated with decreased levels of cognitive function!)

This interesting little study, therefore, suggests that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables (and cruciferous vegetables and carrots, in particular) may help to preserve memory, and other higher cognitive functions, in the aging brain.  The findings of this study are especially interesting in view of the rapidly aging populations of many countries around the world, including the United States.           

 

For an evidence-based review of the critical importance of diet in a cancer prevention lifestyle, order your copy of my new landmark book, A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race,” from Amazon or Barnes & Noble!



 

Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a different perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: 

 

Texas Blues Jam



I and the staff of Weekly Health Update would again like to take this opportunity to thank the more than 100,000 health-conscious people, from around the world, who visit this premier global health information website every month.  (As of 9/16/2010, more than 1,000,000 health-conscious people have logged onto Weekly Health Update so far this year!)  As always, I enjoy receiving your stimulating feedback and questions, and I will continue to try and personally answer as many of your inquiries as I possibly can.



 

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Concord Grape Juice Improves Memory

January 24, 2010 by  
Filed under dementia

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“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”

 

CONCORD GRAPE JUICE IMPROVES MEMORY

 

Polyphenols are plant-based dietary compounds with known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.  These biological properties of polyphenols reduce the ongoing damage to the DNA in our cells that results from the toxic byproducts of metabolism, including free radicals.  Polyphenols have, therefore, been the subject of intense research as potential prevention agents for a variety of human ailments, including cardiovascular disease, dementia, and cancer.  (The evidence-based role of dietary polyphenols in cancer prevention is discussed in great detail in my soon-to-be-published book, “A Cancer Prevention Guide for the Human Race.”)

Foods that are naturally rich in polyphenols include most blue and red berries, grapes (including red wine), pomegranates, walnuts, peanuts, olive oil, green tea, dark chocolate and cocoa, coffee, and beer (as well as other fruits and vegetables). 

Recent animal research has suggested that polyphenols derived from grape seeds can reduce the development of plaques in the brain (at least in mice) that are associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease.  Now, a newly published prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical research study suggests that Concord grape juice, which is rich in polyphenols, may be able to improve early memory decline in older adults.

In this small study, which has been published in the British Journal of Nutrition, 12 elderly adults with declining memory were divided into two groups.  The “experimental group” received daily Concord grape juice supplements for a period of 12 weeks.  The second group, the “control group,” received placebo supplements that were identical in appearance to Concord grape juice, but which contained no juice.  Neither the 12 patient volunteers nor the research assistants were aware of which patients received grape juice and which patients received the placebo while the study was being conducted.

Standardized, validated tests of memory, and other aspects of cognitive function, were administered to all 12 patient volunteers participating in this study.  These cognitive function tests revealed statistically significant improvements in verbal learning skills among the patients who received 12 weeks of Concord grape juice (when compared to the placebo group).  Although not statistically significant, improvements were also noted in both verbal and spatial recall among the patient volunteers who received the grape juice supplements in this small clinical study with a brief duration of patient follow-up.

While larger studies, with a longer duration of follow-up, will be required to confirm the findings of this small pilot study, the prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind nature of this small study does give it considerably more predictive power than the much larger dietary survey-based epidemiological studies that are more commonly used in disease prevention research. 



In view of the extreme devastation and human misery brought about in Haiti by the recent earthquake, Weekly Health Update asks our tens of thousands of caring readers to give generously to established charities that are currently working in that country to assist the injured, the ill, and the homeless there.  There are many such legitimate charities, including the following two:

http://www.redcross.org/

http://www.imcworldwide.org/haiti



Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author



For a somewhat lighter perspective on Dr. Wascher, please click on the following YouTube link: 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7-Tdv7XW0qg



 

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Ginkgo Biloba, Memory & Cognitive Health

Welcome to Weekly Health Update



 

“A critical weekly review of important new research findings for health-conscious readers”


GINKGO BILOBA, MEMORY & COGNITIVE HEALTH

 

 

Regular readers of this column know that I have a strong interest in lifestyle- and diet-based approaches to disease prevention, but that I insist on rigorous, high-quality research-based data before I can recommend a particular lifestyle or dietary modification to my readers (or to myself).  Many past columns have reviewed the findings of research studies with favorable results associated with specific nutritional or other lifestyle approaches to disease prevention.  However, this week’s column will report on a newly published prospective clinical research trial that calls into question the supposed clinical value of the traditional Chinese medicine herb Ginkgo biloba in reducing the cognitive decline associated with aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Previously published public health research data, based upon low-powered research methods, have suggested that dietary supplementation with Ginkgo biloba might be able to improve memory and cognition, particularly in older adults.  However, more recent data, based upon more robust types of clinical research, have called this assumption into question (as well as previous claims that Gingko biloba can delay or reverse the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer’s disease).  Now, a newly published prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of Gingko biloba supplementation in older adults in the United States appears to have definitively resolved the controversy about the value of Gingko biloba in maintaining memory, and other high level cognitive functions, in older adults. 

 

 

Ginkgo biloba trees are often referred to as living fossils, as they are known to survive for 1,500 years or more, and their presence has been documented within fossil-bearing rocks more than 270 million years old.  Although ancient fossils containing the distinctive bilobed leaves of Ginkgo biloba trees have been found on multiple continents, modern day Gingko trees now grow naturally only in China (although they have been widely cultivated, over a period of centuries, throughout Asia, and particularly in Japan and Korea).    

 

A new highly-powered prospective clinical research trial evaluating Ginkgo biloba supplementation appears in this week’s issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.  More than 3,000 adults between the ages of 72 and 96 years participated in this placebo-controlled research trial, with an impressive average patient follow-up duration of more than 6 years.  These patient volunteers were secretly randomized to one of two groups.  The patients in the “experimental group” received 120 mg of Ginkgo biloba extract twice daily during the course of this study, while the “control group” of patients received an identical-appearing placebo (“sugar pills) twice daily.  (As this was a double-blind study, neither the patient volunteers nor the researchers knew which patients were receiving Gingko pills and which were receiving the placebo pills until after the research study was completed.) 

 

Multiple validated cognitive screening exams were given to all of these older patient volunteers during each year of the study, and the rate of annual decline in cognitive function was then compared between the two groups of patient volunteers.  Areas of cognitive function that were specifically tested for in this high-powered prospective clinical research trial included memory, attention, visual-spatial abilities, language function, and overall executive brain function.  (Note: these same cognitive function tests are also routinely utilized to assess cognitive function in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.)

 

Unfortunately, there was absolutely no difference observed or measured in the rate of decline in cognitive function between the two groups of older patient volunteers, indicating the lack of any clinically detectable benefit in age-related cognitive decline associated with high-dose supplementation with Ginkgo biloba.

 

(As an editorial aside, the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) is to be commended for publishing this rigorously performed clinical research trial and its Level One research findings, as there is a well-known bias against publishing clinical research studies with “negative findings,” such as this study, among prestigious medical journals.)

 

 

Although this is the second recent high-level prospective clinical research trial that has found absolutely no clinical benefit in preserving or improving cognitive function in older adults associated with Ginkgo biloba supplements, there may still be potential clinical applications for this ancient herbal remedy in view of its known ability to improve blood flow through networks of small blood vessels in the body.  There is also some research evidence available suggesting that Ginkgo biloba may have potentially important anti-inflammatory properties, and that these properties might be clinically useful in some chronic inflammatory diseases, such as ulcerative colitis (Ginkgo biloba, ulcerative colitis & colorectal cancer).  For now, however, the overwhelming available clinical research evidence indicates that Ginkgo biloba appears to offer no benefit to older patients in terms of either preserving or improving memory, or in improving other areas of higher cognitive function.

 


Disclaimer: As always, my advice to readers is to seek the advice of your physician before making any significant changes in medications, diet, or level of physical activity


Dr. Wascher is an oncologic surgeon, a professor of surgery, a cancer researcher, an oncology consultant, and a widely published author


 

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